The glittery galaxies that make up this rich image were taken with the 2.6-meter state-of-the-art VLT Scanning Telescope designed to scan the sky of the ESO in visible light. The characteristics of crowded crowns spread throughout the image provide astronomers with the finest details of the galaxy’s structures.

Elliptical Elegance - image on https://universegap.com
NGC 5018 is located around the center of the cathedral view. The galaxy in the direction of the Virgo constellation resembles a common bubble at first glance. However, when examined closely, it can be seen that vague star and gas flows – gravitational tail – extend out of this elliptical galaxy. (ESO / Spavo a)

Although the ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) can examine in detail the very faint celestial objects, astronomers still have to use different kinds of telescopes with much greater visibility when they want to know how the very different kinds of celestial bodies are formed. The VLT Scan telescope (VST) is such a telescope. This presents the opportunity to make detailed celestial scans of the southern skies of astronomers in Chile’s untouched sky.

Vst’n the powerful scanning features VST community of elliptical galaxies in the southern celestial an international team of astronomers scanning the Early-type galaxies (VEGAS) [1] has enabled them to perform [2] . A team led by Marilena Spavobe from the INAF-Capodimonte Astronomical Observatory in Naples, Italy using the sensitive OmegaCAM sensor [3] on VST obtained images of such large bodies of different environments.

The effected image (ESO / Spavone et al.).
Above: The effected image (ESO / Spavone). 
On the right: Wide angle NGC 5018. (ESO / Spavone)
NGC 5018 from wide angle (ESO / Spavone et al.)

One of these chairs is the milk-white NGC 5018, which is located around the center of the cathedral. The galaxy in the direction of the Virgo constellation resembles a common bubble at first glance. However, when examined closely, it can be seen that vague star and gas flows – gravitational tail – extend out of this elliptical galaxy. Graceful gradients, such as gravitational tails and stellar flows, are the hallmark of interglacial interactions and provide important clues about the structure and dynamics of the cascades.

Apart from many elliptical (and a few helical) galaxies in this striking 400-megapixel image, the bright front-planets in our own galaxy Samanyolu are also included in the images. These stellar surpluses in vivid blue, such as HD 114746 near the center of the image, are not the subject of this astronomical portrait, but are only between the Earth and the target. Less obvious, but impressive, are the faint traces of asteroids in our own Solar System. Just below NGC 5018, asteroids 2011 can be seen along a faint trail image – captured by several consecutive observations – left by TJ21 (110423). Further farther to the right, another asteroid – 2000 WU69 (98603) – has left traces in this magnificent image.

For astronomers, millions of light-years have searched for the properties of distant galaxies, but at the same time they have caught hundreds of light-years nearby stars and even faint traces of asteroids at light-minute distances from our Solar System. Even when working on the farthest corners of the universe, the sensitivity of the ESO telescopes and the dark sky of Chile offer admirable observations of areas very close to us.

Notes

[1] It is a deep multi-band imaging scan of early-type breeds carried out by the VEGAS VLT Scanning Telescope (VST) and led by Enrichetta Iodice at INAF-Astronomy Observatory.

[2] Elliptical cascades are also known as early-kind cascades, not because of their age, but because they are now thought to be more known as spiral galaxies, according to an opinion now known to be false. Early-type galaxies have smooth elliptical shapes and are generally insufficient in gas and active star formation. In astonishing diversity of shapes and species, the galaxies are classified as Hubble Sequence.

[3] The OmegaCAM is a highly sensitive camera consisting of 32 single-shot conjugate sensors and producing 256 mega-pixel images 16 times wider than the ESA / NASA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Scan Camera (ACS). The OmegaCAM is designed and built with the consortium member entities in the Netherlands, Germany and Italy and the contributions provided by the ESO

Elliptical Elegance - image pinit_fg_en_rect_red_28 on https://universegap.com

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